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The Bouquet-a-Week Project: Week Nine

I went a bit wild in Week Nine, deciding to buy flowers early in the day, but not going to the Pike Place Market until close to 5 p.m. on a chilly Thursday afternoon when I wasn’t even sure many flower farmers would still be there.

But thank heavens, under the Market Clock, several hearty farmers were still creating bouquets and happily hawking their wares.

I walked up and down the aisle, comparing and contrasting the premade bouquets but not finding one that really caught my eye as in weeks past.

Instead, I spotted a white-plastic bucket jam-packed with spiky purple tulips and another that contained ruffly daffodils with tiny heads.

Upon closer inspection, I realized that the there were two or three small daffodils on each stem. Quickly, I asked for 10 of them, along with six of the purple tulips.

The rather unfriendly farmer (I think she wanted to go home–and who could blame her, it was late, after all) handed me my flowers and asked for $11.

Right next to that farmer, I saw another woman with a bucket full of beautiful branches that I thought might be from a dogwood tree. But the delicate flowers were pale yellow, and I’ve never seen a yellow dogwood. When I inquired, the farmer said they were branches from a magnolia tree, my late mother’s favorite. I asked for one branch, which cost all of $3.

I felt like a queen as I walked south along First Avenue to our condo with two bouquets in hand that cost a grand total of $14. When I got home, I realized that, consciously or subconsciously, I had chosen blossoms in my husband’s and my favorite colors (yellow and purple, respectively).

Here are the raw flowers from that wild week.

Week Nine: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers
Week Nine: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers

And here are the flowers “painted” using the Waterlogue app.

Week Nine: Raw Flowers in Waterlogue
Week Nine: Raw Flowers in Waterlogue

Here is one of the major bouquets I created that week using only three of the spiky purple tulips and the magnolia blossom. To me, this bouquet is the essence of the principal of ikebana.

Week Nine: Three Tulips and Magnolia Branch
Week Nine: Three Tulips and Magnolia Branch

Here is the same bouquet, after one of the tulips had broken in the middle and (oh, so sadly) had to be pulled out and reused in a smaller bouquet. Since the base photo was taken at night, the background became all dark and moody, with intriguing shadows at the top.

Week Nine: Two Tulips and Magnolia Branch at
Week Nine: Two Tulips and Magnolia Branch at Night

This bouquet (which really isn’t so much a bouquet as the positioning of two of the purple tulips in a vase!) is so sexy. I love it when my tulips behave just as I want them.

Week Nine: Two Purple Tulips in a Circular Vase
Week Nine: Two Purple Tulips in a Circular Vase

Here are the same two tulips in a tall “vase” that was originally a water bottle (!). It isn’t nearly as sexy, but fun to see how different it is than the arrangement above.

Week Nine: Two Purple Tulips in a Tall Vase
Week Nine: Two Purple Tulips in a Tall Vase

And here are some of the smaller bouquets from Week Nine that make use of the gorgeous multi-headed daffodils and pussy willows (left over from a prior week) in various vases.

Week Nine: Three Small Vases--Green, Green, and Pink
Week Nine: Three Small Vases–Green, Green, and Pink
Week Nine: Three Small Vases--Green, Light Pink, and Dark Pink
Week Nine: Three Small Vases–Green, Light Pink, and Dark Pink

Here is the vase that I most often use in our bedroom since space is limited. I am a new convert to these double- and triple-headed daffodils and plan to seek them out next time I’m at the Market.

Week Nine: Two Daffodils and Pussy Willow
Week Nine: Two Daffodils and Pussy Willow

Musing on My New Vase

Have you ever had that experience where you walk by a storefront and realize that something just caught your eye? You think about it for a moment, then just know that you have to go back and find out more about the object in question.

That happened to me on a recent Sunday-afternoon stroll down First Avenue in downtown Seattle. We walk there often since it is part of our neighborhood, which is known as the “West Edge” because it is on the western edge of the city adjacent to Elliott Bay.

The store in question was Design Within Reach, a long-time favorite. We have purchased everything from flatware to bath towels and even our living-room sofa there over the years!

The object that caught my eye was a vase with a clear-glass bottom and a brass circle rising from the center. Various dried flowers stuck up from the holes in the brass circle forming a pleasing pattern.

Once inside, the salesperson informed me it was Design Within Reach’s brand-new “Ikebana Vase.” Imagine my delight to learn that a principal I often use in my flower arranging (ikebana) was now incorporated into an actual vase sold by one of my favorite retailers.

I learned that the vase comes in a large size (like the one in the window) and a smaller one. Knowing I would want to photograph the vase on our metal etagere (where I take many of my flower photos for posting on the Braiden Blossoms blog), I chose the smaller version because I knew it would fit better and be a better scale for the space.

According to the Design Within Reach website, the vase was designed in 2016 by a young Spaniard, Jaime Hayon. Ikebana is Japanese for “making flowers live,” and Mr. Hayon designed the vase to “honor your flowers from top to bottom.”

In other words, unlike more conventional vessels, the Ikebana Vase honors the whole flower and not just the crown.

The two drilled plates are made of stainless steel covered with brass. They will scratch and age and develop a rich patina over time.

The brass plates are designed for exact positioning of each blossom (in order to create precise arrangements).

I was sad when the salesperson informed me that there was no small vase I could take home with me that day. Rather, as has become customary with many retailers in the modern world, my merchandise would have to be ordered from the Design Within Reach warehouse in Kentucky.

The salesperson said the delivery would take five to seven business days. Disappointed, but excited to see the Ikebana Vase whenever it arrived, I  put my new purchase out of my mind.

Several days later, on the Saturday before Easter, I got notice that a package had arrived at our condominium’s front desk. When I saw that the big box was from Design Within Reach, I got really excited and hurried to cut it open.

The Ikebana Vase itself came in a gorgeous robin’s-egg blue box, similar to those from Tiffany & Co. A good beginning!

The glass base was thick, well formed, and beautifully crystal clear. It reminded me of a giant camera lens. The brass circle insert where the flowers would stand was easy to put together and felt strong and solid as I carefully positioned it in the base of the vase.

Luckily, I had some fresh pink tulips on hand that I knew would work well in my new vase. Here is the photo of the fresh tulips in the new vase.

Ikebana Vase Raw Tulips
New Ikebana Vase with Raw Tulips

I could hardly wait to “paint” my original photo using my beloved Waterlogue app. Here is that image in Waterlogue’s Vibrant mode.

Ikebana Vase Waterlogue Tulips in Color Bloom Mode
Ikebana Vase Waterlogue Tulips in Vibrant Mode

And here is the raw photo “painted” in Bold mode.

Ikebana Vase Waterlogue Tulips in Bold Mode
Ikebana Vase Waterlogue Tulips in Bold Mode

This is Waterlogue’s Color Bloom mode.

Ikebana Vase Waterlogue Tulips in Color Bloom Mode
Ikebana Vase Waterlogue Tulips in Color Bloom Mode

All are gorgeous and I love my new vase!

Week Eight: The Bouquet-a-Week Project

On a Thursday morning during Week Eight, I asked my darling husband to bring home a dozen tulips of his choosing from the Pike Place Market. This is always a dicey prospect as I have no idea what varieties and colors he’ll choose. But since we usually like the same things, I was ever hopeful.

As usual, he did a great job. When he rang the doorbell and thrust a white-butcher-paper-wrapped bouquet into my hands, I discovered 12 tightly closed tulips in six primary and pastel colors: pale pink, orange-red, orange-red with a black center, purple “parrot” tulips (those with alluring ruffly petals), plain yellow, and plain-yellow “parrot” tulips. Here are the raw tulips from Week Eight:

Week Eight: Raw Tulips
Week Eight: Raw Tulips

And here are the tulips “painted” using the Waterlogue app.

Week Eight: Raw Tulips in Waterlogue
Week Eight: Raw Tulips in Waterlogue

For one of my major flower arrangements, I chose sea-glass decorative filler and an apple-blossom stalk left over from Week Seven.

Week Eight: Four Orange-Red Tulips with Sea Glass
Week Eight: Four Orange-Red Tulips with Apple Blossom and Sea Glass

Another major arrangement, made using my favorite Asian celadon vase, employed two of the left over apple blossoms and two beguiling yellow tulips. I love how the flowers curve perfectly. Thanks, tulips!

Week Eight: Two Yellow Tulips with Apple Blossom
Week Eight: Two Yellow Tulips in Celadon Vase with Apple Blossom

In addition to the two major bouquets I created that week, I was able to design six smaller arrangements. I place these smaller bouquets on my desk, beside the double vanities in our bathroom, in our bedroom, and in our foyer.

Here are those “baby” bouquets, starting with a gorgeous purple tulip, greenery, and a single pussy-willow branch. Mea culpa: the greenery and pussy willow were left over from bouquets purchased two or three weeks ago. But the waxy leaves and branches seem to stay alive forever, so why not make use of them?

Week Eight: Single Tulip Clear Vase
Week Eight: Single Tulip in a Clear Vase with Greenery and Pussy Willow

Here’s another simple, clear vase, but with one of the orange-red tulips and greenery.

Week Eight: Single Red-Orange Tulip in a Simple Clear-Glass Vase
Week Eight: Single Red-Orange Tulip in a Simple Clear-Glass Vase

The third variation features another orange-red tulip, but in an Asian-inspired black vase.

Week Eight: Single Red-Orange Tulip in a Black Vase
Week Eight: Single Red-Orange Tulip in a Black Vase

To finish with a bang, here are several of the smaller vases shot in groupings of three.

Week Eight: Three Small Vases with Tulips
Week Eight: Three Small Vases with Tulips
Week Eight: Three Small Vases with Tulips Variation 2
Week Eight: Three Small Vases with Tulips Variation 2

The Bouquet-a-Week Project: Week Seven

Week Seven started off with a bang when I went to the Pike Place Market and bought a pre-arranged bouquet for $20 from one of the long-time flower farmers who sets up her stand under the famous Market clock.

This bouquet really caught my eye, thanks to the apple blossoms and gorgeous pink camellia at its center. It also included four pale, ruffly daffodils and eight tulips in white and pale pink. My idea of heaven!

Here is a photo of the fresh blossoms.

Week Seven Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips
Week Seven: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips

And here is my favorite shot of the fresh blossoms after I “painted” them in the Waterlogue app.

Week Seven: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips in Waterlogue
Week Seven: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips in Waterlogue

I felt like a kid in a candy shop with such a bounty of fresh blossoms to play with. From 14 flowers and lots of greenery, I created three major bouquets and three smaller ones.

Here is my favorite among the major bouquets. It is the essence of ikebana.

Two Daffodils and Two Apple Blossoms in a Clear Glass Vase
Week Seven: Two Daffodils and Two Apple Blossoms in a Clear Glass Vase

Here is another arrangement I am very proud of. I love how the tulips drape so effortlessly and sensuously across the curves of the interesting clear-glass vase backlighted in an aggressive shade of purple.

Three Tulips in a Curved Glass Vase
Week Seven: Three Tulips in a Curved Glass Vase

Here is the third major bouquet from Week Seven. The tulips were being very cooperative as they all stood up straight and aligned perfectly. A rarity!

Five Pink Tulips in a Crystal Vase
Week Seven: Five Pink Tulips in a Crystal Vase

In addition to the three major bouquets, from the big pre-made bouquet from the Pike Place Market, I was able to craft a trio of smaller arrangements. I place these in our bathroom (one on each side of the double vanity) and another on the stand-up desk in my office.

This perfect single pink camellia reminds me of my mother, who used to raise camellias when I was growing up in the suburbs of Philadelphia. How she got these Southern-region flowers to survive there is beyond me. She also nurtured several young magnolia trees in our front yard until they towered over the Japanese Maples.

Single Camellia and Two Apple Blossoms in a Simple Glass Vase
Week Seven: Single Camellia and Two Apple Blossoms in a Simple Glass Vase

Three of the pale, lacy daffodils and some greenery fit perfectly with this green-glass vase that I got when I was a child and we visited Williamsburg, Virginia.

Two Lacy Daffodils in a Green Vase
Week Seven: Two Lacy Daffodils in a Green Vase

This single camellia looks gorgeous in my cobalt Buddha vase.

Single Pink Camellia in a Cobalt Buddha Vase
Week Seven: Single Pink Camellia in a Cobalt Buddha Vase

The Bouquet-a-Week Project: Week Six Flowers

Week Six of the Bouquet-a-Week Project brought a new twist on the original theme. Instead of buying a pre-made bouquet from one of the Hmong farmers at the Pike Place Market, or hand-picking 15 or 20 tulips, I limited myself to just 12 blooms.

It was an intriguing challenge to myself–how many bouquets and what sort of arrangements would 12 tulips produce?

As I have done over the past few weeks, I purchased this week’s fresh tulips at Alm Hill Gardens.

This long-time Market farmer has deep roots, so to speak in the region’s farm-to-table and Slow Flower movement, having farmed near Bellingham, Washington, (in the far northern part of the state) since the 1970s.

Here is the Waterlogued “painting” of the bevy of beautiful blossoms.

Week Six: Fresh Tulips from the Pike Place Market
Week Six: Fresh Tulips from the Pike Place Market

I divided the tulips by color and decided that the dramatic combination of red and yellow would form a harmonious whole with a glossy, Asian-leaning black vase to produce one my Week Six’s major bouquets. A single pussy-willow stem adds a touch of Spring.

Week Six: Red and Yellow Tulips
Week Six: Red and Yellow Tulips Bouquet

This was the second large bouquet I created during Week Six. If you look carefully, you will see two white tulips on either side. I love how the Waterlogue app blows then out, so you have to use your imagination to fill in the blanks and figure out what they might look like.

Week Six Yellow and White Tulips Shimmery Green Vase
Week Six: Yellow and White Tulips Shimmery Green Vase

A single pink tulip and arching pussy-willow stems and bear grass make a simple, but elegant statement. These smaller bouquets are the sort that sits on my desk, in our bathroom, or the bedroom.

Week Six: Tulip and Pussy Willows Bouquet
Week Six: Tulip and Pussy Willows Bouquet

I took a few of the cool “feathers” and some greenery from a prior week’s bouquet and merged them with a single red tulip. A vivid turquoise Buddha vase contrasts nicely.

The drooping petal on the right side was imperfect, but I kind of liked it because it looked vaguely like an open mouth. Imperfection is an important concept in flower-arranging. At first (years ago), I tried to keep my tulips upright with all the usual tricks, such as placing a penny in the water.

But more recently, I have embraced drooping tulips and those that grow wildly toward the light, almost as if they are alive. This concept of imperfection is well-known in Japanese culture. You can read more about Wabi-Sabi elsewhere on this website.

Week Six: Red Tulip and Feathers Blue Vase Bouquet
Week Six: Red Tulip and Feathers Blue Vase Bouquet

Another bright-blue vase with a more structured shape was the perfect “home” for a yellow tulip, red “feathers,” and some left-over tulip leaves. This is a cool new trick I have discovered these past six weeks. . .save the long, unblemished leaves you pull off the bases of your tulips and re-use them in your arrangements for instant–and free–greenery!

Week Six: Yellow Tulip in a Blue Vase Bouquet
Week Six: Yellow Tulip in a Blue Vase Bouquet

I bought this cool, contemporary glass vase at a Christmas Market in Germany last year. It is the perfect size for a single bloom and a few pieces of greenery.

Week Six: Multi-colored Tulip and Sassy Red Vase Bouquet
Week Six: Multi-colored Tulip and Sassy Red Vase Bouquet

The Bouquet-a-Week Project: Week Five Flowers

In Week Five of the Bouquet-a-Week project, I asked my darling husband to bring home an pre-made bouquet from the Pike Place Market instead of my usual ritual of choosing the individual flowers myself.

Here is that gorgeous creation that included daffodils (my first time working with them this Spring!), salmon-colored tulips (already open, versus the way I usually buy them, which is tightly closed), a plethora of pussy willows, abundant greenery (mainly waxy, medium-sized leaves on thin, yet strong woody stems), and cool “feathers” (for lack of a better description or knowledge of what they really were).

Also, breaking with tradition, I decided to photograph the gorgeous bouquet from above since it was so round and wide. We have a pretty throw rug over part of our maple floors, and it formed a fitting backdrop for this bouquet.

Week Five: Fresh Tulips from the Pike Place Market
Week Five: Fresh Tulips from the Pike Place Market

From the abundance of that original $20 bouquet, I produced two large bouquets and six smaller ones.

Here is the large daffodil and pussy-willow bouquet in a fun glass pitcher versus a more formal vase.

Week Five: Daffodil and Pussy Willow in a Glass Pitcher Bouquet
Week Five: Daffodil and Pussy Willow in a Glass Pitcher Bouquet

This violet-colored terra-cotta vase has always been a favorite. Instead of using pink or purple tulips in the purple base (the most logical choice), I prefer to contrast the color of the vase with peach or yellow flowers encircled by greenery.

Week Five: Pink Tulips in a Purple Ceramic Vase Bouquet
Week Five: Pink Tulips in a Purple Ceramic Vase Bouquet

Here are those cool spiky “feathers” that form the perfect backdrop for a slightly sinister single red tulip with a yellow interior and bear grass draping gracefully.

Week Five: Single Tulip in a Green Vase Bouquet
Week Five: Single Tulip in a Green Vase Bouquet

Simply by changing out the tulip you get a totally different arrangement!

Week Five: Pink Tulip in a Green Vase Bouquet
Week Five: Pink Tulip in a Green Vase Bouquet

This was my first time using some “decorative filler” we bought at our local Michaels art and hobby store. The gayly colored glass beads and lozenges formed the perfect base for this single salmon tulip and one stem of greenery in a clear conic vase.

Week Five: Pink Tulip in a Red-Marble-Filled Vase Bouquet
Week Five: Pink Tulip in a Red-Marble-Filled Vase Bouquet

I love this pale-pink “buddha” vase that started life as a sake bottle (!). I have the same one in blue and together they make a dramatic duo.

Week Five: Pink Tulips in a Pink Vase with Red Feathers and Leaves Bouquet
Week Five: Pink Tulips in a Pink Vase with Red Feathers and Leaves Bouquet

Sometimes you don’t even need flowers to make attractive “floral” arrangements. Here greenery and the spiky red “feathers” contract perfectly with their brightly colored vases.

Week Five: Greenery and Red Feather Bouquets
Week Five: Greenery and Red Feather Bouquets

The Bouquet-a-Week Project: Week Four Flowers

This is the fourth straight week that I have bought flowers at the Pike Place Market, arranged and photographed them, then “painted” them using the Waterlogue app. Here is the watercolor of this week’s raw materials.

Week Four: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips
Week Four: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips

New this week? Yellow and white hyacinths, whose heady fragrance scented our home all week.

Because the hyacinths were still on their bulbs, I positioned them in a low, squatty vase along with a shortened salmon tulip for color and some left-over tulip fronds.

Week Four: Yellow and White Hyacinths Bouquet
Week Four: Yellow and White Hyacinths Bouquet

This cylindrical vase, filled half-way with clear glass marbles (whose official name is “decorative filler”) provided the perfect vessel for half a dozen red and yellow tulips and a bit of bear grass. A glowing green backlight illuminates the arrangement.

Week Four: Red and Yellow Tulips and Clear Marbles Bouquet
Week Four: Red and Yellow Tulips and Clear Marbles Bouquet

I took the same vase, once again lined with glass marbles, and substituted different tulips and pink backlight for a whole new look!

Week Four: Yellow Tulips and Pink Light Bouquet
Week Four: Yellow Tulips and Pink Light Bouquet

Pink “double” tulips (tulips with multiple blossoms) looked gorgeous in a trio of colorful vases.

Week Four: A Trio of Tulip Bouquets
Week Four: A Trio of Tulip Bouquets

Later in the week, all but one of the hyacinths had died. So I took the remaining one and gave it new life in a fresh vase.

Week Four: Yellow Hyacinth in a Yellow and Black Vase Bouquet
Week Four: Yellow Hyacinth in a Yellow and Black Vase Bouquet

Even almost-dead tulips (ones that are completely open and a bit frayed around the edges) can find a new lease on life. I shot this survivor from above along with a few sprigs of bear grass.

Week Four: Single Blossom on Rug

The Bouquet-a-Week Project: Weeks One, Two, and Three Flowers

On a sunny Saturday afternoon in the middle of February, I bought a bouquet of tulips at my beloved Pike Place Market, which is located a salmon toss from our downtown Seattle condo.

Once home, without really knowing why, I took a photo of the fresh blossoms, just unwrapped from their white-paper sheath.

Week One: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips
Week One: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips

As always, arranging the flowers–choosing the perfect vases, stones and marbles (which are officially called “decorative fillers”), and even deciding on the level of the water in each vase–brought me a great deal of pleasure. It’s something I’ve been doing for years for fun and relaxation, not to mention the resulting beauty.

The blossoms I bought that first week produced several different bouquets. I photographed each of them on the top of the metal-and-glass etagere that inhabits one corner of our living room. It’s the space where I place my largest, most dramatic bouquets so we can admire them.

With sunlight streaming in on one side from floor-to-ceiling windows, this corner space painted in stark white is perfect for taking natural-light photos.

After I shot the various vases, I “painted” them using the Waterlogue application, which creates dramatic and inspiring watercolor images. It’s perfect for someone like me who has no natural artistic talent.

Here are the fresh tulips after being “painted” in the Waterlogue app.

Week One: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips in Waterlogue
Week One: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips in Waterlogue

And here is my favorite bouquet from that week. I love how the pink and white tulips almost disappear from the canvas. . .and the way the imagination fills in the gaps.

Week One: Pink Tulips in a Tulip Vase Bouquet
Week One: Pink Tulips in a Tulip Vase Bouquet

The following week, almost reflexively, I once again took a photo of the fresh bundle of flowers I’d purchased at the Pike Place Market.

Week Two: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips
Week Two: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips

Then I took the flowers and “Waterlogued” them.

Week Two: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips in Waterlogue
Week Two: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips in Waterlogue

Next I arranged, photographed, and “Waterlogued” the resulting bouquets. Here are my favorite bouquets from that week.

Bouquet #1:

Week Two: Sassy Red Tulips and Pussy Willows Bouquet
Week Two: Sassy Red Tulip and Pussy Willow Bouquet

Bouquet #2:

Week Two: Pink Tulips in an Iron-Stand Vase Bouquet
Week Two: Pink Tulips in an Iron-Stand Vase Bouquet

The third week I switched things up and bit and bought my tulips from a long-time Market farmer–Alm Hill Gardens–which is now affiliated with Growing Washington. They set up their farm table in the middle of the North Arcade, right in front of City Fish.

Funny coincidence, Gretchen Hoyt and Ben Craft, who founded Alm Hill Gardens more than 50 years ago, gave me two recipes for the first edition of my Pike Place Market Cookbook. The resulting book was published in 1992 and went on to sell more than 70,000 copies!

Week Three: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips in Waterlogue
Week Three: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips in Waterlogue

That third week, while cutting and trimming the exquisite blossoms, an idea “germinated.” Why not buy a bouquet at the Market every week during the fresh-flower growing season? I could continue the process of photographing the raw flowers, arranging them into several bouquets, “painting” them using the  Waterlogue application, then posting them on my new Braiden Blossoms website.

Here is one of my favorite bouquets from Week Three, arranged from the exquisite “parrot” and “double” tulips that I bought that Saturday at Alm Hill Gardens. “Parrot” tulips are cup-shaped with lots of ruffly petals. “Double” tulips, as the name implies, have at least two buds per stem, although some boast as many as four or five smaller tulips, which I refer to as “baby” tulips.

Week Three: Yellow Tulips in a Tall Gray Vase Bouquet
Week Three: Yellow Tulips in a Tall Gray Vase Bouquet

And another bouquet from Week Three.

Week Three: Yellow and Orange Tulips in a Tulip Vase Bouquet
Week Three: Yellow and Orange Tulips in a Tulip Vase Bouquet

The idea of the new project began to consume me. Consciously and unconsciously (while doing the wash or cooking dinner), I began to noodle around on the perfect name for the new project and the best ways to expand on and enrich the original concept.

I slept on the idea for several nights, waking up at odd hours and jotting down notes while still half asleep. This had happened a lot when I was writing my food-and-wine books and articles and I had long ago learned to give into and honor my creative urges, no matter where or when they occurred.

Finally, one morning in the wee hours, somewhere between the dream state and wakefulness, the name hit me.

So as not to bother my husband, who lay beside me sound asleep, I stumbled to the bathroom where I keep a pad and paper for just such precious, unpredictable moments.

In the semi-darkness, I scribbled the name: The Bouquet-a-Week Project.