Week Thirteen: Blue-and-White Striped Vase with Yellow and Orange Tulips

The Bouquet-a-Week Project: Week Thirteen

Week Thirteen was full of firsts–the first time I had worked with Asian lilies during this spring season and the first time I had used two new vases to create my floral bouquets.

It was also the first time I had blown my normal $20-a-week budget. But I couldn’t resist four Asian lilies that cost $4 apiece for a total of $16.

Then I needed a half dozen tulips for additional smaller bouquets. The hand-lettered paper sign above the flower farmer’s stand said that a dozen tulips cost $10, so I figured that if I got half a dozen, I’d just be $1 over budget.

But naughty me. I chose six “double” tulips. So when I handed the farmer a ten-spot, she thanked me and turned her attention back to a bouquet she had been arranging.

When questioned, she explained that the “double” tulips cost twice as much as “regular” tulips. In any case, I knew I would enjoy them and that they would photograph beautifully, then “Waterlogue” well.

Here are the ten stems I purchased that day.

Week Thirteen: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers
Week Thirteen: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers

And here are the fresh flowers “painted” in Waterlogue.

Week Thirteen: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers in Waterlogue
Week Thirteen: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers in Waterlogue

I got greedy and used all four Asian lilies in the first of two major bouquets I created during Week Thirteen. You’ll note that this is one of the new vases. . .an extremely tall bamboo rectangle with a clear glass cone hidden inside to keep the flowers watered. It worked perfectly with the four long-stemmed orange and pink Asian lilies that I set in opposing corners. Some tall red branches created a dramatic finishing touch.

Week Thirteen: Tall Bamboo Vase with Four Asian Lilies and Red Branches
Week Thirteen: Tall Bamboo Vase with Four Asian Lilies and Red Branches

Here is the other new vase that I admired in a Target advertisement and bought for $9.99. Hand-painted in China, each container is a bit different. I like the way the navy paint drips down through the white stripes. With the addition of three tulips, it almost has a Dutch-painterly, Vermeer-like vibe.

Week Thirteen: Blue-and-White Striped Vase with Yellow and Orange Tulips
Week Thirteen: Blue-and-White Striped Vase with Yellow and Orange Tulips

Here are the three smaller bouquets I designed during Week Thirteen using the remaining three “double” tulips in reddish-orange and bright yellow colors.

Week Thirteen: Three Small Vases with Fiery Reddish-Orange and Yellow Tulips
Week Thirteen: Three Small Vases with Fiery Reddish-Orange and Yellow Tulips

A few days later, after the Asian lilies had opened into their full glory, I reshot them in the bamboo vase.

Week Thirteen: Four Lilies in a Bamboo Vase Version 2
Week Thirteen: Four Lilies in a Bamboo Vase Version 2

Then I removed the bamboo exterior and pulled out the glass conical vase inside and rearranged three of the blossoms.

Week Thirteen: Three Lilies in a Clear Glass Vase with a Red Branch
Week Thirteen: Three Lilies in a Clear Glass Vase with a Red Branch

I positioned the remaining pale-pink lily, which was positively bursting with blooms, in my favorite robin’s-egg blue curving vase along with a trio of pussy willows and greenery. Here’s that gorgeous shot in Waterlogue.

Week Thirteen: One Pink Lily in a Curved Pale Blue Vase
Week Thirteen: One Pink Lily in a Curved Pale Blue Vase

The Bouquet-a-Week Project: Week Eight

On a Thursday morning during Week Eight, I asked my darling husband to bring home a dozen tulips of his choosing from the Pike Place Market. This is always a dicey prospect as I have no idea what varieties and colors he’ll choose. But since we usually agree on similar aesthetics, I was ever hopeful.

As usual, he did a great job. When he rang the doorbell and thrust a butcher-paper-wrapped bouquet into my hands, I discovered 12 tightly closed tulips in six primary and pastel colors: pale-pink, orange-red, orange-red with a black center, purple “parrot” tulips (those with alluring ruffly petals), plain yellow, and plain-yellow “parrot” tulips. Here are the raw tulips from Week Eight:

Week Eight: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips
Week Eight: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips

And here are the tulips “painted” using the Waterlogue app.

Week Eight: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips in Waterlogue
Week Eight: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips in Waterlogue

For one of my major flower arrangements, I chose sea-glass decorative filler and an apple-blossom stalk left over from Week Seven.

Week Eight: Four Orange-Red Tulips with Sea Glass
Week Eight: Four Orange-Red Tulips with Apple Blossom and Sea Glass

Another major arrangement, made using my favorite Asian celadon vase, employed two of the left-over apple blossoms and two beguiling yellow tulips. I love how the flowers curve perfectly. Thanks, tulips!

Week Eight: Two Yellow Tulips with Apple Blossom
Week Eight: Two Yellow Tulips in Celadon Vase with Apple Blossom

In addition to the two major bouquets I created that week, I was able to design six smaller arrangements. I place these smaller bouquets on my desk, beside the double vanities in our bathroom, in our bedroom, and in our foyer.

Here are those “baby” bouquets, starting with a gorgeous purple tulip, greenery, and a single pussy-willow branch. Mea culpa: the greenery and pussy willow were left over from bouquets purchased two or three weeks ago. But the waxy leaves and branches seem to stay alive forever, so why not make use of them?

Week Eight: Single Tulip Clear Vase
Week Eight: Single Tulip in a Clear Vase with Greenery and Pussy Willow

Here’s another simple, clear vase, but with one of the orange-red tulips and greenery.

Week Eight: Single Red-Orange Tulip in a Simple Clear-Glass Vase
Week Eight: Single Red-Orange Tulip in a Simple Clear-Glass Vase

The third variation features another orange-red tulip, but in an Asian-inspired black vase.

Week Eight: Single Red-Orange Tulip in a Black Vase
Week Eight: Single Red-Orange Tulip in a Black Vase

To finish with a bang, here are several of the smaller vases shot in groupings of three.

Week Eight: Three Small Vases with Tulips
Week Eight: Three Small Vases with Tulips
Week Eight: Three Small Vases with Tulips Variation 2
Week Eight: Three Small Vases with Tulips Variation 2

The Bouquet-a-Week Project: Week Six

Week Six of the Bouquet-a-Week Project brought a new twist on the original theme. Instead of buying a pre-made bouquet from one of the flower farmers at the Pike Place Market, or hand-picking 15 or 20 tulips, I limited myself to just 12 blooms.

It was an intriguing challenge–how many bouquets and what sorts of arrangements would 12 tulips produce?

As I have done over the past few weeks, I purchased this week’s fresh tulips at Alm Hill Gardens.

Week Six: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips
Week Six: Fresh Pike Place Market Tulips

This long-time Market farmer has deep roots (so to speak) in the region’s farm-to-table and Slow Flower movement, having farmed near Bellingham, Washington, (in the far northern part of the state) since the 1970s.

Here is the Waterlogued “painting” of the bevy of beautiful blossoms.

Week Six: Fresh Tulips from the Pike Place Market in Waterlogue
Week Six: Fresh Tulips from the Pike Place Market in Waterlogue

I divided the tulips by color and decided that the dramatic combination of red and yellow would form a harmonious whole with a glossy, Asian-leaning black vase. A single pussy-willow stem adds a touch of Spring in the first major bouquet of Week Six.

Week Six: Red and Yellow Tulips in a Bulbous Black Vase
Week Six: Red and Yellow Tulips in a Bulbous Black Vase

This was the second large bouquet I created during Week Six. If you look carefully, you will see two white tulips on either side. I love how the Waterlogue app blows then out, so you have to use your imagination to fill in the blanks and figure out what they might look like.

Week Six: Pink and White Tulips in a Shimmery Green Vase
Week Six: Pink and White Tulips in a Shimmery Green Vase

A single pink tulip and arching pussy-willow stems and bear grass make a simple, but elegant statement. These smaller bouquets are the ones that sit on my desk, in our bathroom, and in the bedroom.

Week Six: Tulip and Pussy Willows
Week Six: Tulip and Pussy Willows

I took a few of the cool “feathers” and some greenery left over from the Week Five  bouquet and merged them with a single red tulip. A vivid turquoise Buddha vase contrasts nicely.

The drooping petal on the right side was imperfect, but I kind of liked it because it looked vaguely like an open mouth. Imperfection is an important concept in flower-arranging. At first (years ago), I tried to keep my tulips upright with all the usual tricks, such as placing a penny in the water.

But more recently, I have embraced drooping tulips and those that grow wildly toward the light, almost as if they are alive. This concept of imperfection, or Wabi-Sabi, is well-known in Japanese culture.

Week Six: Red Tulip and Feathers in a Blue Vase Bouquet
Week Six: Red Tulip and Feathers in a Blue Vase

Another bright-blue vase with a more structured shape was the perfect “home” for a yellow tulip, red “feathers,” and some left-over tulip leaves. This is a cool new trick I have discovered these past six weeks. . .save the long, unblemished leaves you pull off the bases of your tulips and re-use them in your arrangements for instant–and free–greenery!

Week Six: Yellow Tulip and Red Feathers in a Blue Vase
Week Six: Yellow Tulip and Red Feathers in a Blue Vase

I bought this contemporary glass vase at a Christmas Market in Germany last year. It is the perfect size for a single bloom and a few pieces of greenery.

Week Six: Multi-Colored Tulip and Bear Grass in a Sassy Red Vase
Week Six: Multi-Colored Tulip and Bear Grass in a Sassy Red Vase

The Bouquet-a-Week Project: Week Five

In Week Five of the Bouquet-a-Week project, I asked my darling husband to bring home an pre-made bouquet from the Pike Place Market instead of my usual ritual of choosing the individual flowers myself.

Here is that gorgeous creation that included daffodils (my first time working with them this spring!), salmon-colored tulips (already open, versus the way I usually buy them, which is tightly closed so they last longer), a plethora of pussy willows, abundant greenery (waxy, medium-sized leaves on thin, yet strong woody stems), and cool “feathers” (for lack of a better description or knowledge of what they really were).

Week Five: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers
Week Five: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers

Also, breaking with tradition, I decided to photograph the gorgeous bouquet from above since it was so round and wide. We have a pretty throw rug over part of our maple floors, and it formed a fitting backdrop for this bouquet.

Week Five: Fresh Flowers from the Pike Place Market in Waterlogue
Week Five: Fresh Flowers from the Pike Place Market in Waterlogue

From the abundance of that original $20 bouquet, I produced two large bouquets and six smaller ones.

Here is the large daffodil and pussy-willow bouquet in a glass pitcher versus a more formal vase.

Week Five: Daffodil and Pussy Willows in a Glass Pitcher
Week Five: Daffodil and Pussy Willows in a Glass Pitcher

This violet-colored terra-cotta vase has always been a favorite. Instead of using pink or purple tulips in the purple base (the most logical choice), I chose to contrast the color of the vase with peachy yellow flowers encircled by greenery.

Week Five: Peachy Tulips in a Purple Ceramic Vase
Week Five: Peachy Tulips in a Purple Ceramic Vase

Here are those cool spiky “feathers” that form the perfect backdrop for a slightly sinister single red tulip with a yellow interior. Bear grass drapes gracefully in the background.

Week Five: Single Tulip in a Green Vase
Week Five: Single Tulip in a Green Vase

Simply by changing out the tulip you get a totally different arrangement!

Week Five: Pink Tulip in a Green Vase Bouquet
Week Five: Pink Tulip in a Green Vase Bouquet

This was my first time using some “decorative filler” we bought at our local Michaels art and hobby store. The gayly colored glass beads formed the perfect base for this single salmon tulip and one stem of greenery in a clear conic vase.

Week Five: Pink Tulip in a Glass-Marble-Filled Vase
Week Five: Pink Tulip in a Glass-Marble-Filled Vase

I love this pale-pink “buddha” vase that started life as a sake bottle (!). I have the same one in blue and together they make a dramatic duo.

Week Five: Pink Tulips in a Pink Buddha Vase with Red Feathers and Leaves
Week Five: Pink Tulips in a Pink Buddha Vase with Red Feathers and Leaves

Sometimes you don’t even need flowers to make attractive “floral” arrangements. Here greenery and the spiky red “feathers” contrast perfectly with their brightly colored vases.

Week Five: Greenery and Red Feather
Week Five: Greenery and Red Feather

The Bouquet-a-Week Project: Week Four

This is the fourth straight week that I have bought flowers at the Pike Place Market, created multiple flower arrangements, photographed them, then “painted” them using the Waterlogue app. Here are this week’s raw materials.

Week Four: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers
Week Four: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers

And here are the same fresh flowers “painted” in Waterlogue.

Week Four: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers in Waterlogue
Week Four: Fresh Pike Place Market Flowers in Waterlogue

New this week? Yellow and white hyacinths, whose heady fragrance scented our home all week.

Because the hyacinths were still on their bulbs, I positioned them in a low, squatty vase along with a shortened salmon tulip for color and some left-over tulip fronds.

Week Four: Yellow and White Hyacinths
Week Four: Yellow and White Hyacinths

This cylindrical vase, filled half-way with clear glass marbles (whose official name is “decorative filler”) provided the perfect vessel for half a dozen red and yellow tulips and a bit of bear grass. A glowing green backlight illuminates the arrangement.

Week Four: Red and Yellow Tulips and Clear Marbles
Week Four: Red and Yellow Tulips and Clear Marbles

I took the same vase, once again lined with glass marbles, and substituted different tulips and pink backlight for a whole new look!

Week Four: Yellow Tulips and Pink Light
Week Four: Yellow Tulips and Pink Light

Pink “double” tulips (tulips with multiple blossoms) looked gorgeous in a trio of colorful vases.

Week Four: A Trio of Tulip Bouquets
Week Four: A Trio of Tulip Bouquets

Later in the week, all but one of the hyacinths had given up the ghost. So I took the remaining one and gave it new life in a fresh vase.

Week Four: Yellow Hyacinth in a Yellow and Black Vase
Week Four: Yellow Hyacinth in a Yellow and Black Vase

Even almost-dead tulips (ones that are completely open and a bit frayed around the edges) can find a new lease on life. I shot this survivor from above along with a few sprigs of bear grass.

Week Four: Single Blossom on a Blossom-Strewn Rug
Week Four: Single Blossom on a Blossom-Strewn Rug